Mom’s hormones during pregnancy affect children lifelong

By Dr. Alan Kadish NMD

Not surprisingly hormones during pregnancy have a lasting impression on one’s children. This study looked at the effect of elevated cortisol, our stress hormone when one is experiencing depression. They correlated the outcome of the higher stress hormone levels, with bonding of the mother, and other health effects .

There is a growing body of evidence that the need for a safe and stress-free as possible environment for pregnancy is essential and should become a standard of care.

One of the takeaways from the research is that multigenerational epigenetic impact translates from mom’s stress to our children. This means that as the mother’s hormones, specifically cortisol, it changes the expression of the fetus’s DNA, and it’s going to affect the child’s offspring for generations. This area of evaluation and recognition is fast becoming a focus of our understanding of how we function, the needs for environmental controls, especially during the prenatal and during pregnancy and what to do to decrease our offsprings medical issues, from our choices. 

Stay tuned for lots more information linking our environmental exposures with our DNA expressions and seeing why your grandparent’s choices are imprinted in your DNA’s expressions.

Want more information and to stay informed ? Call us at the Center of Health 541.773.3191

Depression in pregnancy increases risk of mental health problems in children

Imperial College London Health News09/28/2016

Depression in pregnancy increases the risk of behavioural and emotional problems in children, says a new review published in The Lancet Psychiatry journal. The authors of the review, which focused mainly on low and middle-income countries, call for urgent interventions for mothers and children. Previous work from a team at Imperial College London suggests depression during pregnancy may affect the development of the baby while in the womb, as well as affecting bonding between mother and child after birth. Now, the same team

Previous work from a team at Imperial College London suggests depression during pregnancy may affect the development of the baby while in the womb, as well as affecting bonding between mother and child after birth. Now, the same team have shown that depression or anxiety can reduce the enzyme in the placenta that breaks down the ‘stress hormone’ cortisol, possibly causing more foetal exposure to the hormone. The foetus may also undergo epigenetic changes under stress, where underlying DNA stays the same but expression of that DNA is altered, perhaps affecting mental health during childhood.

The foetus may also undergo epigenetic changes under stress, where underlying DNA stays the same but expression of that DNA is altered, perhaps affecting mental health during childhood. The new review examined studies of mental health in children under five years old in low and middle-income countries such as Bangladesh and Brazil. The report highlights the specific mental health requirements of mothers and children in poorer countries that are not necessarily relevant to high–income countries. The authors argue that because of the varying risk factors between different income countries, interventions for poorer countries should focus on the issues that affect these countries specifically. They add that mitigating the global burden of maternal depression will require a multi–faceted approach that targets child development, poverty, education, health, and prevention of violence in low– and middle–income countries.

The authors argue that because of the varying risk factors between different income countries, interventions for poorer countries should focus on the issues that affect these countries specifically. They add that mitigating the global burden of maternal depression will require a multi–faceted approach that targets child development, poverty, education, health, and prevention of violence in low– and middle–income countries.

The new review examined studies of mental health in children under five years old in low and middle-income countries such as Bangladesh and Brazil. The report highlights the specific mental health requirements of mothers and children in poorer countries that are not necessarily relevant to high–income countries. The authors argue that because of the varying risk factors between different income countries, interventions for poorer countries should focus on the issues that affect these countries specifically. They add that mitigating the global burden of maternal depression will require a multi–faceted approach that targets child development, poverty, education, health, and prevention of violence in low– and middle–income countries.

The new review examined studies of mental health in children under five years old in low and middle-income countries such as Bangladesh and Brazil. The report highlights the specific mental health requirements of mothers and children in poorer countries that are not necessarily relevant to high–income countries. The authors argue that because of the varying risk factors between different income countries, interventions for poorer countries should focus on the issues that affect these countries specifically. They add that mitigating the global burden of maternal depression will require a multi–faceted approach that targets child development, poverty, education, health, and prevention of violence in low– and middle–income countries.

They add that mitigating the global burden of maternal depression will require a multi–faceted approach that targets child development, poverty, education, health, and prevention of violence in low– and middle–income countries.

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Dr. Kadish is an unusual physician often referred to as a "doctor detective". His expertise is the evaluation and treatment of complex disorders, typically after other physicians have been stumped, is renowned. He provides care for all family members and has additional training in autistic spectrum disorders and chronic complex diseases.