Apple Juice consumption leads to higher Asthma rates

by Dr. Alan Kadish NMD

We feed our kids juices without thinking of the consequences. It’s now found to be less favorable than previously thought and consuming just 5 drinks of apple juice per week, doubled the asthma rates. The Public Health study evaluated almost 2000 kids for 3 years.

Before you consider changing to other soft drinks or fruit drinks, forget it. They were no better and created the same results of higher asthma rates.

If you read our previous piece on how allergic children are at highest rate of heart disease later in life, you should consider alternatives asap. Consider more use of …. vegetable juices.

Not necessarily V-8 juice, as it has two much salt and is not organic.  You can purchase organic veggie juices from a number of vendors. One large caveat is when I looked at the many new organic juices I was taken aback with the amount of sugar in many of the offerings. This high sugar intake will negate any of the positives over time, as it creates a situation that increases inflammation which we know is damaging to your health.

As another idea…make your own juices ! It’s also a great way to positively influence your children’s taste buds toward better foods and get them involved in food preparation.  Easy on the carrots as their sweetness, although natural, is still high in sugars if your adding a bunch.  One of the key’s is to vary the colors of the veggies to be adding a whole spectrum of nutrients and flavors.

One other tip. Use a blender or a juicer that does not remove the fiber from the veggies. I’m a fan of the expensive vita-mix product line as it works well and the texture is great. Will other products work, absolutely !

Want a diet/lifestyle evaluation that can optimize your families health ? Call us at the Center of Health 541-773-3191.


Intakes of apple juice, fruit drinks and soda are associated with prevalent asthma in US children aged 2-9 years.

Public Health Nutr. 2016 Jan;19(1):123-30. doi: 10.1017/S1368980015000865. Epub 2015 Apr 10.DeChristopher LR, Uribarri J, Tucker KL.

Abstract
OBJECTIVE:
High soft drink consumption has been linked with asthma. Anecdotal evidence links high-fructose corn syrup with asthma. The receptor of advanced glycation end products (RAGE) has emerged as a mediator of asthma. The objectives of the present study were to: (i) assess the correlation between intake of beverages containing excess free fructose (EFF beverages) and asthma in children; and (ii) epidemiologically test the mechanistic hypothesis that intake of high EFF beverages, such as apple juice or beverages sweetened with high-fructose corn syrup, is associated with increased risk of asthma. This hypothesis is based on the possible effect of increases in the in situ intestinal formation of advanced glycation end products (enFruAGE) with EFF, which may be absorbed and play a role in RAGE-mediated asthma.


DESIGN:
We examined cross-sectional associations between beverage intake and self-reported current or history of asthma. Exposure variables were EFF beverages, including apple juice (AJ), non-diet soft drinks (ndSD) and fruit drinks (FD). Orange juice (OJ), not an EFF beverage, was included as a comparison. Rao-Scott χ 2 analysis was used for prevalence differences and logistic regression for associations, adjusted for age, sex, race/ethnicity, BMI and total energy intake.


SETTING:
Data are from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2003-2006, a nationally representative survey.


SUBJECTS:
US children (n 1961) aged 2-9 years with complete responses on the dietary frequency questionnaire.


RESULTS:
Intakes of EFF beverages were significantly associated with asthma in 2-9-year-olds. Adjusted odds of asthma in children consuming EFF beverages ≥5 times/week was more than five times that in children consuming these beverages ≤1 time/month (OR=5·29, P=0·012). Children consuming AJ ≥5 times/week v. ≤1 time/month, adjusted for the other beverages, were more than twice as likely to have asthma (OR=2·43, P=0·035). In contrast, there was a tendency for OJ to be protective.


CONCLUSIONS:
These results support the hypothesis that intake of high EFF beverages, including AJ and beverages sweetened with high-fructose corn syrup, is associated with asthma in children aged 2-9 years. Results support the mechanistic hypothesis that enFruAGE may be an overlooked contributor to asthma in children. Longitudinal studies are needed to provide evidence of causal association.

PMID: 25857343

[PubMed – in process]

An overview:

Intakes of apple juice, fruit drinks and soda are associated with prevalent asthma in US children aged 2-9 years

Public Health Nutrition, 01/11/2016

The objectives of the present study were to: (i) assess the correlation between intake of beverages containing excess free fructose (EFF beverages) and asthma in children; and (ii) epidemiologically test the mechanistic hypothesis that intake of high EFF beverages, such as apple juice or beverages sweetened with high–fructose corn syrup, is associated with increased risk of asthma. These results support the hypothesis that intake of high EFF beverages, including AJ and beverages sweetened with high–fructose corn syrup, is associated with asthma in children aged 2–9 years. Results support the mechanistic hypothesis that enFruAGE may be an overlooked contributor to asthma in children. Longitudinal studies are needed to provide evidence of causal association.

Methods

  • They examined cross–sectional associations between beverage intake and self–reported current or history of asthma.
  • Exposure variables were EFF beverages, including apple juice (AJ), non–diet soft drinks (ndSD) and fruit drinks (FD). Orange juice (OJ), not an EFF beverage, was included as a comparison.
  • Rao–Scott Χ2 analysis was used for prevalence differences and logistic regression for associations, adjusted for age, sex, race/ethnicity, BMI and total energy intake.
  • Data are from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2003–2006, a nationally representative survey.
  • US children (n 1961) aged 2–9 years with complete responses on the dietary frequency questionnaire.

Results

  • Intakes of EFF beverages were significantly associated with asthma in 2–9–year–olds.
  • Adjusted odds of asthma in children consuming EFF beverages ≥ 5 times/week was more than five times that in children consuming these beverages ≤ 1 time/month (OR=5•29, P=0•012).
  • Children consuming AJ ≥ 5 times/week v. ≤ 1 time/month, adjusted for the other beverages, were more than twice as likely to have asthma (OR=2•43, P=0•035).
  • In contrast, there was a tendency for OJ to be protective.

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Dr. Kadish is an unusual physician often referred to as a "doctor detective". His expertise is the evaluation and treatment of complex disorders, typically after other physicians have been stumped, is renowned. He provides care for all family members and has additional training in autistic spectrum disorders and chronic complex diseases.